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  • WhenJuly 31—September 27, 2020
  • Opening6pm, July 30, 2020
  • CuratorTony Oates

With an exhibiting career spanning 40 years, James Rogers is best known for abstract sculptures in steel, recently shown to great acclaim at Watters Gallery in Sydney. This survey highlights several distinct bodies of work. The earliest series revels in a vivacious play of colour, tumbling forms made from plywood. More recent works feature curving “ribbons” cut from steel pipes, gesticulating expansively. They form superbly choreographed arabesques. In other instances, the steel ribbons (which are cut from larger-bore pipes) resemble stacked-up, giant brushstrokes – as if Tony Tuckson’s gestural language had been re-interpreted in 3-D.

Rogers’ sculptures evoke bodily gesture and human stance. Several allude to the expressive possibilities once offered to sculptors by the undulating folds of draped cloth. Other works harness optical illusions produced by a moiré of superimposed steel mesh, or by overlapping, perforated steel plates. This timely survey presents one of the most accomplished contemporary Australian sculptors in his prime.

Install Images

James Rogers Installation view

James Rogers Installation view

James Rogers Installation view

James Rogers Installation view

James Rogers Installation view

James Rogers Installation view

James Rogers Installation view

James Rogers Installation view

James Rogers Installation view

James Rogers Installation view

James Rogers Installation view

James Rogers Installation view

James Rogers Installation view

James Rogers Installation view

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Publication

Buy Now / $25 (excl postage)

  • TitleJames Rogers: Tunnelvision
  • SpecsSoftcover, 68 pages, 22.1 x 22.9 cm.
  • PublisherPublished 2020 by DHG Publishing.
  • DetailsJames Rogers with text by Nameer Davis, Terence Maloon, James Rogers.
  • ISBN
  • Price$25 (excl postage) / Buy Now

This exhibition has been generously supported by the ANU Visual Arts Endowment.

The Drill Hall Gallery acknowledges the Ngunnawal and Ngambri peoples, the traditional custodians of the Canberra region, and recognises their continuous connection to culture, community and Country.

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