DRILL HALL GALLERY LECTURE SERIES 2018

LECTURE 6: SUNDAY 7 OCTOBER 3pm

GORDON BULL – TITIAN IN THE REALM OF THE SENSES

Titian, The Bacchanal of the Andrians, (1523–1526), 175 cm × 193 cm, Museo del Prado, Madrid.

This lecture will be a long look at Titian’s The Bacchanal of the Andrians(1523-26). It will attempt to explain why it is one of the greatest paintings of the High Renaissance. Along with an account of the Renaissance fervour for Classical culture it will consider the art of painting in the Renaissance, and in particular the relationship of this particular painting to senses other than sight, especial to hearing and touch (although taste and smell will also make an appearance). The key concerns of the painting are intoxication and sensuality, and the lecture will invite you all to drink deeply of its pleasures.

Gordon Bull is an art historian. He retired from teaching at the Centre for Art History and Art Theory (CAHAT) at the ANU School of Art & Design at the end of 2017, having taught full-time at the school for 27 years, beginning in 1991. He was Head of the Art Theory Workshop from 1996 to 2006, and Head of School from 2006 to 2013. He is now a visiting fellow at CAHAT. Gordon received his Master of Arts from the University of Sydney in 1991. Before joining the ANU he tutored at the University of Sydney, and from 1988-90 was a Lecturer in the Department of Fine Arts at the University of Western Australia. His favourite painter is (currently) Titian.

ALL LECTURES are held at the ANU School of Art and Design Lecture Theatre
Level 1 Childers Street entrance – at 3pm  TICKETS AT THE DOOR $10 / $5  (student)
FRIENDS of the Gallery FREE

LECTURE 5: SUNDAY 2 SEPTEMBER 3pm

TERENCE MALOON – 500 YEARS OF FIGURE DRAWING …A CURATOR’S ODYSSEY

Giovanni Battista Tiepolo A falling figure C1792 red and white chalk, on faded blue paper, 266 x 311mm. Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

In the year 2000, Sydney was “the Olympic city”. An exhibition was mooted for the Art Gallery of NSW, purporting to celebrate the body beautiful. The exhibition was envisaged to consist of drawings borrowed from the world’s greatest museum collections. The task of curating it fell to two highly inexperienced individuals who were set on a steep learning curve. One of them, Terence Maloon, recounts the life-changing adventure of compiling this landmark exhibition.

 

LECTURE 4: SUNDAY 5 AUGUST 3pm

HELEN ENNIS – OLIVE COTTON – A LIFE IN PHOTOGRAPHY

Discover the life and work of Australian photographer Olive Cotton.

Helen Ennis, former Director of the ANU Centre for Art History and Art Theory, will deliver a lecture on the life and work of Olive Cotton (1911 -2003), a pioneer of modernist photography in Australia.

Olive Cotton is recognised for her elegant style, using controlled lighting and shadows to photograph landscapes, flowers, domestic objects and people.

Helen Ennis has published extensively on Cotton, including the major essays, ‘The Space of Biography: Writing on Olive Cotton’ and ‘Olive Cotton at Spring Forest’, and is currently writing her biography. Helen will share her reflections of Olive Cotton’s lifelong passion for photography and offer new insights into the complex, fascinating relationship between her life and work.

 

 

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DRILL HALL GALLERY LECTURE SERIES 2017: CÉZANNE

Widely considered to be the fountainhead of modern painting, his influence extending  from Gauguin to De Kooning, what exactly did Paul Cézanne communicate to these other artists that established  him as such an important inspiration for four or five generations?

His provincial beginnings, his life-defining friendship with Émile Zola, his struggle to assimilate the conventions and skills required to succeed in the nineteenth-century art world, his withdrawal from the Parisian scene for almost twenty years when he entirely ceased exhibiting, and the uncompromising oddity of his personality all marked him out as “a five-legged beast”, according to one of his contemporaries.

Many recent commentators, in a spirit of conciliation, have striven to smooth-off the rough edges and normalise Cézanne’s art, as well as his eccentric relationships with others. Some exaggerate the anti-social and morbid legends, guessing at schizophrenia, homosexual crushes, rampant misogyny and irremediable incompetency in mastering the very basis of figure painting.

This series of seven lectures will anatomize the complex and paradoxical achievement of a unique creative spirit. Tracing the long journey from his initial clumsy efforts to the dazzling ingenuity of his mature accomplishment, Cézanne’s rough edges and brazen contradictoriness will be respected throughout.

Terence Maloon was the curator of Classic Cezanne, the exhibition held at the Art of New South Wales in 1998. He contributed a major essay to the catalogue of the exhibition Cézanne Finished Unfinished ( Kunstforum Vienna and Zurich Kunsthaus 1999). He is a member of the Société Paul Cézanne in Aix-en-Provence. In 2006 he led an epic cultural tour for the Art Gallery Society of New South Wales entitled “In the Footsteps of Cézanne”.

ALL LECTURES are held at the ANU School of Art and Design Lecture Theatre 

Level 1 Childers Street entrance – at 3PM

1: SUNDAY 5 MARCH – A ROMANTIC FRIENDSHIP: ÉMILE ZOLA AND PAUL CÉZANNE
2: SUNDAY 7 MAY  – CÉZANNE AS ROMANTIC REBEL
3: SUNDAY 4 JUNE – CÉZANNE, PISSARRO AND THE IMPRESSIONIST GROUP
4: SUNDAY 6 AUGUST – THE ARTIST OF DOUBT, CONTRADICTION AND CRISIS
5: SUNDAY 3 SEPTEMBER – THE MAN OF THE SOUTH
6: SUNDAY 1  OCTOBER – CÉZANNE AS ‘CLASSIC’
7: SUNDAY 5 NOVEMBER – CÉZANNE’S POSTERITY

Updated:  25 September 2018/ Responsible Officer:  DHG Director/ Page Contact:  Drill Hall Gallery